art

Deformed hands illustrated by "Two students high-fiving each other, close up, view from below" generated by Leonardo.ai

Why you should generate AI images in your classroom

Text generators like ChatGPT have dominated my conversations with educators about AI in the past year. Despite their emergence a year before chatbots, text-to-image generators like DALL-E or Midjourney typically come up only in generic conversations about plagiarism or bias. This is understandable, both because writing has been central to so many disciplines and because …

Why you should generate AI images in your classroom Read More »

NMD Webinar graphic

Webinars examine impact of AI on coders and creators

As part of its Learning With AI initiative, UMaine’s New Media program continues to offer free webinars on ways generative AI like ChatGPT and Midjourney are disrupting today’s workplaces and workflows. These online discussions feature New Media faculty and alumni reporting from the front lines of fields such as business, digital art, web development, video …

Webinars examine impact of AI on coders and creators Read More »

At the Edge of Art (cover)

Technology is not neutral. Just ask the artists

How has the boundary between art and non-art shifted in the Internet age, and what does that mean for design, activism, science, and other creative activities? This question is the subject of a Dario Moalli’s fall 2019 interview with Still Water co-directors Joline Blais and Jon Ippolito in the venerable periodical Hestetika (Aesthetics). The issue …

Technology is not neutral. Just ask the artists Read More »

“Right To Unmake” CAA panel examines Lego-like creativity

While the maker movement continues to gather publicity, one of its most critical dynamics seldom makes the headlines: the right to unmake. Now the College Art Association has published a call for presentations on unmaking and “Lego-like” creativity for its next annual conference in Los Angeles in February 2018.

Is reinterpretation the new emulation?

Reinterpretation as a preservation strategy has been called “radical” and “dangerous,” yet this unconventional approach has seen a surge of interest in preservation communities in the past year. In a departure from conventional wisdom about conservation, a group of European preservation experts recently invited Still Water’s Jon Ippolito to reassess this controversial technique as a …

Is reinterpretation the new emulation? Read More »

Scroll to Top