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Innovators CoverStill Water is pleased to announce the publication of 60: Innovators Shaping Our Creative Future, a landmark book on the occasion of the 60th anniversary of renowned art and design publishing house Thames & Hudson. Still Water co-directors Joline Blais and Jon Ippolito penned the new media section of this book, which profiles five of the most innovative creators on the planet today.

These visionaries take the lessons learned from experiments in online communities and apply them to real-world problems, whether making cities sustainable, holding corporations accountable, or re-imagining laws that govern the flow of information. Included among these innovators are Maine’s own Miigam’agan and gkisedtanamoogk, Wabanaki elders who are building bridges between their ancestors’ lifeways and the 21st century.

“Every now and again along comes a book that acts as a cultural bookmark … Thames & Hudson’s new doorstopper Sixty is just such a book” — Grafik Magazine

“A collection of incredible, truly inspiring work from all over the world.” — The Design Files.

“Showcases the most creative minds in fashion, architecture, photography, green technology and science.” — New Scientist

“Fascinating insights into global projects that may predict future directions are presented here in an informative and visually appealing format.” — Library Journal

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A landmark publication from renowned art-and-design publisher Thames & Hudson will examine the latest generation of innovators from art, architecture, design, and related fields. Joline Blais and Jon Ippolito have co-authored the new media section of the book.

Drawing on and extending themes from At the Edge of Art, Blais and Ippolito examine five artists and activists who bring strategies from the realm of electronic networks into action in the real world.

This highly produced volume is due to be published later this year, on the occasion of Thames & Hudson’s sixtieth anniversary.

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Bill Giordano hosted the Penobscot Valley Permaculture Meetup by giving a tour of the LongGreenHouse grounds.

Visitors feasted on Young Me’s cheesecake, potato salad made with our own duck eggs, sample a variety of greens in the polyculture bed, and strategized solutions for the persistent university stormwater run-off that flows into the north corner of the site.

We may be seeing the emergence of a permanent pond, with drainage to the street culverts.

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 Still Water’s living-learning center on Chapel Street, LongGreenHouse, has been exploring the intersection between Native culture and Permaculture with students from many walks of life. In July thirty students from the university’s Upward Bound program attended Joline Blais’ workshops on greenhouses and plant guilds.

Longgreenhouse Logo pinMeanwhile kids from LongGreenHouse’s Wassookeag school have been busy too: in April they made dreamcatchers with Penobscot elder Charlene Francis; in July they visited the Black Bear Food Guild; in September they built a geodesic dome with Intermedia MFA student Bill Giordano. The BBFG’s July newsletter described the Wassookeag students as “intelligent, thoughtful, and incredibly enjoyable”; they “had a zeal for learning that was really amazing.”

More at http://wassookeag.org

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Subversion Poster illStill Water Research Fellow and Wabanaki elder gkisedtanamoogk joined Joline Blais and Jon Ippolito in presenting Still Water’s innovative legal template for fostering collaboration across cultural divides at a Cambridge University conference entitled Subversion, Conversion, Development: Public Interests in Technologies.

Meant to expand the conversation begun at Still Water’s 2006 and 2007 Connected Knowledge conferences, this meeting featured researchers in the fields of anthropology, philosophy, religious studies, and the tech industry.

See the ThoughtMesh summary of the Subversion conference.

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